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Quality Minutes

A collection of video case studies covering a wide variety of topics.

The versatile and educational Quality Minutes series from Juran Global is a collection of true case examples that illustrate and reinforce how breakthrough performance improvements were achieved in a wide variety of organizations. Covering wide-ranging libraries of interest, each video segment dramatizes the actual planning, implementation, and results of breakthrough concepts. The examples can be used with individuals and groups of all sizes in many different ways to bring real world examples to life for employees at all levels.

Easy to use, each 90-second video story stimulates discussion, brainstorming, and creativity, and demonstrates how companies used process improvement tools and techniques to solve problems and achieve six sigma results. Each real-world example introduces and encourages thoughtful examination and the learning of proven processes and results. They can be used for opening meetings, maintaining continuity during breaks in large or small conferences, conducting project team reviews, steering teams, seminars, and strategic planning retreats. Typically, only one segment will be used at the right opportunity with subsequent examples during follow-on sessions.

Chili Peppers

Establishing measures for quality is vital. When measures don’t exist, they have to be invented. In this segment, we learn how an objective system of measurement was created to determine the “hotness” of chili peppers.

Dont Cook Your Chicks

A chicken egg takes 21 days to incubate. No more, no less. Quality pioneer Dr. Joseph Juran uses a blow torch on some eggs to dramatize that some processes just can’t be rushed. Similarly, a company embarking on quality efforts needs to allow ample time for changes in its culture and structure to take hold.

Florence Nightingale

During the Crimean War, Nurse Florence Nightingale used the graphic presentation of data to convince the skeptical British Army Medical Corps to make sweeping sanitary reforms in military hospitals.

Granite Rock’s ATM

Granite Rock, a Malcolm Baldrige Award winner, benchmarked banks and gas stations and borrowed their ATM technology to improve delivery and increase sales and profits. The segment illustrates how we can learn from studying other industries (not just our competition).

Hair Nets

Hair net makers went out of business by responding to customers’ stated needs (customers wanted better hair nets). The makers of hair sprays took over the market by responding to the customers’ real needs (they wanted something to keep their hair in place).

Hospital IVs

At this hospital, over $100,000 of medication was poured down the drain every year. A team used a flow diagram analysis to reveal the hidden reason and save the hospital $87,000 a year.

Stone Hill Winery

The difference between a company’s “mission” and “vision” is made sparkling clear in this example. By clearly distinguishing between the two, Stone Hill Winery was able to increase sales by over 70 percent and create a huge and loyal customer base.

The Baldie Fund

Is TQM worth all the effort? In this segment, we compare the market performance of recognized quality leaders to the Standard & Poor index. This example dramatizes the superior market performance of those companies who make “quality” a key business strategy.

The Jefferson Memorial

By asking “why, why, why?” the National Parks Service solves a chronic problem and discovers the true (and surprising) reason why this National Monument was deteriorating.

The New Mustang

Customers and all 400 members of the design team were teamed up to re-plan the classic Mustang. The car was introduced in 25 percent less time and for 30 percent fewer dollars than any comparable development program in Ford’s history.

The San Diego Zoo

In this extended Quality Minute segment, we take a detailed look at how the San Diego Zoo is effectively using self-directed work teams to improve the quality of its business. Some of the resulting benefits of this new approach include a reduction in workers’ compensation claims, higher job satisfaction, lower absenteeism, and an increase in guest attendance.

The Three Hour House

By rethinking and re engineering construction techniques and technology, a well orchestrated team actually built a San Diego home from scratch in less than three hours!

Bank One

Traditionally, customers had to fit their banking needs into “banker’s hours,” but Bank One in Ohio is changing all that. The bank is delighting its customers by opening complete service branches in local supermarkets. Open seven days a week and with expanded hours, the branches allow supermarket shoppers to carry out transactions whenever it is convenient for them. The bank has come to the customer. The result? The new branches report opening more accounts in one month than at any time in their history.

Barefoot Grass Lawn Service

The value of a well-planned recovery strategy is dramatized in this extended Quality Minute. The segment opens with a recollection of Tylenol’s successful handling of the cyanide poisonings in 1982 and 1987. We then look at a lawn service company in Wisconsin that implemented a good recovery strategy to salvage its own disaster. A contaminated batch of fertilizer killed the lawns of all of its clients, but thanks to quick and decisive action, the owners of the company were able to retain 95 percent of their original customers and increase sales by 20 percent.

Captain Hook

Walt Disney has a strong reputation for service quality. It also has a strong service recovery program. We see in this segment how Disney turned an unhappy young guest into a lifelong friend by discovering and immediately fixing a minor oversight in the Magic Kingdom.

Check Cashing

A family grocery store risked losing customer loyalty by blindly copying the check cashing practices of the big grocery chains. The store failed to consider whether the new practice would really solve a problem or improve customer service.

Granite Rock’s ATM

Granite Rock, a Malcolm Baldrige Award winner, benchmarked banks and gas stations and borrowed their ATM technology to improve delivery and increase sales and profits. The segment illustrates how we can learn from studying other industries (not just our competition).

Just In Time Supermarkets

Toyota is one of the most recognized benchmarks of inventory management. Did you know, though, that Toyota’s famous JIT system was the direct result of Toyota benchmarking American supermarkets in the early 1950s?

Lexus

Smart auto makers provide many features that customers expect in a quality automobile. Lexus has still been able to outrun the competition by being the first to provide customers with many unexpected quality features.

Magic Toys

The concept of “replicating quality” is dramatized in this charming example. A wonderfully creative idea generated by a Disney hotel housekeeper brought the magic of Disney World right into a guest’s hotel room. By effectively replicating this idea throughout all of their hotels, Disney has found still another way to dazzle guests with its enviable service quality.

Puttin On the Ritz

Ritz Carlton has outrun the competition by delighting customers with an incomparable level of service. In this segment, we see just how far the hotel goes to dazzle guests with quality.

Remington Rifle Co.

The customers of Remington Rifle Company wanted shinier rifle cartridges (just like the competition had). Remington’s competitors were not about to share their secrets, though, so Remington found the answers it needed by visiting Maybelline cosmetics. After all, Maybelline’s very shiny lipstick cases were similar in size and shape to rifle shells.

The Revitalization of Porsche

Bench-marking Japanese auto makers helped Porsche dramatically turn its fortunes around. This segment explains how the German car company analyzed, adapted and implemented what they had learned during their benchmarking visits to Japan.

Waiting at the Opthalmologist

At this doctor’s office, patients waited up to four hours for an eye exam. By studying how banks, hotels, and even tollbooths handled traffic flows, the office made changes that resulted in spectacular improvements and doubled revenues.

Absent Admissions

The traditional process for hospital admissions is stressful to patients. When a Louisiana hospital designed their new facility, they delighted patients by virtually eliminating the frustrating admissions process.

Anthrax Outbreak

In this segment, a classic quality tool (the concentration diagram) solves a long-standing international mystery. An outbreak of deadly Anthrax in Russia was caused by infected livestock, or so said the Russian government. An American team of scientists used a concentration diagram to prove that the source of the outbreak was in reality a leak at an illegal Russian bio-chemical warfare plant.

Baton Rouge Medical Center

A highly competitive marketplace stimulated this quality planning team to design customer-focused quality features into their new hospital facility. The resulting quality features look more like a first class hotel than a hospital: valet parking, personal escorts, effortless check-in, and patient rooms that really do look like “home.”

Blitz Teams

Why does quality have to take so long? Well, it doesn’t. St. Joseph’s Hospital in New Jersey has created an innovative way to make quality happen fast. A special process allows quality improvements to be implemented in weeks . . . not months. And these super-fast results can be attained in any type of organization.

Call Light Response Times

Establishing measures for quality is vital. When measures don’t exist, they have to be invented. In this segment, we learn how an objective system of measurement was created to determine the “hotness” of chili peppers.

Catheter Complications

For years, the complication rate for catheter insertions at this metropolitan hospital was unacceptably high. A team began to ask “who, what, why, and where” might be causing this chronic problem? When the team discovered the primary reason for these complications, they couldn’t believe the simplicity of the remedy.

The Cholera Epidemic

The cholera epidemic of 1854 provides a backdrop for understanding the value of quality tools (such as concentration diagrams). The segment highlights Dr. John Snow’s famous study that ended the deadly epidemic.

Fad Diets

Fad diets don’t keep the weight off, because there is no permanent effort to change eating habits and lifestyle. There’s a parallel to quality efforts, as we see in this segment.

Florence Nightingale

During the Crimean War, Nurse Florence Nightingale used the graphic presentation of data to convince the skeptical British Army Medical Corps to make sweeping sanitary reforms in military hospitals.

Hospital IVs

At this hospital, over $100,000 of medication was poured down the drain every year. A team used a flow diagram analysis to reveal the hidden reason and save the hospital $87,000 a year.

Waiting at the Opthalmologist

At this doctor’s office, patients waited up to four hours for an eye exam. By studying how banks, hotels, and even tollbooths handled traffic flows, the office made changes that resulted in spectacular improvements and doubled revenues.

Barking Phones

A true, humorous story to illustrate how unexpected the root cause of a problem can be. In this segment, a homeowner calls the local phone company to report a problem with her line. The phone never rings . . . but the dog barks each and every time there’s an incoming call. Why? That’s what the phone company had to diagnose!

Blitz Teams

Why does quality have to take so long? Well, it doesn’t. St. Joseph’s Hospital in New Jersey has created an innovative way to make quality happen fast. A special process allows quality improvements to be implemented in weeks . . . not months. And these super-fast results can be attained in any type of organization.

Catheter Complications

For years, the complication rate for catheter insertions at this metropolitan hospital was unacceptably high. A team began to ask “who, what, why, and where” might be causing this chronic problem? When the team discovered the primary reason for these complications, they couldn’t believe the simplicity of the remedy.

Class Conflicts

A high school in Connecticut applied teamwork and a structured quality improvement process to solve a chronic and frustrating class scheduling problem.

Dial A Mattress

By incorporating new technology into the redesign of its distribution and inventory process, DIAL-A-MATTRESS has reduced the cycle time for shipping mattresses from its warehouse. Customers ordering a mattress by phone can expect home delivery within two hours. The company turns inventory 60 times a year, a tenfold increase compared to the industry average.

Fading Towel Logos

A housekeeping team at a Ritz Carlton hotel identified and solved a colorful problem that saves the hotel chain an estimated $1 million a year.

Finding Files in the Hartford Courts

Unhappy customers and intense media scrutiny motivated this Connecticut Superior Court System to undertake a project to improve its ability to find files. The team discovered that files were missing or unavailable 25 percent of the time. A flow chart analysis pointed to the primary cause of the problem. As a result of the team’s efforts, the number of missing files was reduced by 80 percent.

Fire Fighting or Prevention

The difference between trouble-shooting teams and quality improvement teams is dramatized when we jump aboard a fire truck to compare fire-fighting squads and fire prevention squads.

Folding Towels

By systematically dissecting the problem, a quality improvement team at a Ritz Carlton hotel discovered the true, root cause of a housekeeping activity that had been costing the hotel $30,000 of wasted staff time each and every year.

Good Dog

In this segment, a quality improvement team at the Canine Enforcement Division of the United States Customs Service embarks on a project to increase the graduation rate of dogs entering the force. By discovering the major reason why dogs flunked out of training, the team has dramatically increased the number of graduating dogs.

Hospital IVs

At this hospital, over $100,000 of medication was poured down the drain every year. A team used a flow diagram analysis to reveal the hidden reason and save the hospital $87,000 a year.

How To Eat An Elephant

Elephant-sized quality problems are too big and complex to digest all at once. This segment dramatizes the need to carve up big projects into achievable, bite-sized portions.

Meals Over Bosnia

The U.S. Air Force used teamwork and creativity to cut costs dramatically and improve the delivery of food supplies to war torn eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Retiring Budget Cars

A quality improvement team at Budget Rent-A-Car in Dallas discovered why it had been taking so long to get “retired” cars to the auction block. The resulting remedy saved the Dallas operation over $110,000 a year in vehicle depreciation and savings on interest and transportation costs.

School Lunches

The students at a Connecticut high school used quality methodology and classic analytical tools to improve the quality of school lunches, turning their chronically unprofitable cafeteria into a delicious money maker.

Shell Brazil

A quality team at Shell uncovered an unexpected opportunity to save over $100,000 a year when it analyzed the reasons for delays in the shipment of its products.

Shure

Shure makes great microphones, but they were simply taking much too long to get to market. In this segment, a cross-functional team re-engineered the new product development process, decreasing the total number of steps by 70% and reducing time-to-market from five years to about 14 months. All of this helped move Shure from fifth to second in market share.

Stuck on Quality

A U.S. Air Force quality improvement team used creativity, ingenuity, and a stuffed toy to perform a routine maintenance procedure in 30 seconds, a cat-like plunge from the 30 minutes or more it used to take.

The Case of the Missing Linen

At this hospital in Massachusetts, a quality improvement team systematically tracked down the shocking reason why the hospital had been spending over $200,000 a year to replace lost linen.

The Jefferson Memorial

By asking “why, why, why?” the National Parks Service solves a chronic problem and discovers the true (and surprising) reason why this National Monument was deteriorating.

Cessna Citation X

Cessna Aircraft used a structured approach for designing quality into its newest generation of business jets. The Citation X was introduced to market over a year faster than its predecessors. And because the Cessna team included a wide array of both internal and external customers, they were able to develop this new product with higher quality and greater customer satisfaction. The segment underscores the value of quality planning, training, cross-functional teams, and involving the customer at every step in the design process.

Dux Beds

Have you ever paid $10,000 for a bed mattress? DUX of Sweden has no trouble charging that for their mattresses, because the company has taken steps to design quality features into its products that are so superior to the competition, DUX is able to command premium pricing.

Hair Nets

Hair net makers went out of business by responding to customers’ stated needs (customers wanted better hair nets). The makers of hair sprays took over the market by responding to the customers’ real needs (they wanted something to keep their hair in place).

Home Style Flop

Campbell’s cooked up a soup that flopped in the marketplace, because they failed to identify all of their customers (the shippers, distributors, and retailers were overlooked).

Konica Cameras

Focus groups were not helping Konica understand customer needs, but when the company sent a team to a photo lab, the needs of the picture-taking public were plain to see. Using Pareto analysis to reveal the most frequent photographic errors (underexposure; poor focus; blank film) Konica developed a revolutionary new camera: the world’s first auto-focus, auto-wind, auto-exposure camera.

Leading Questionnaires

Getting feedback from customers is important, but too often, organizations “lead the witness” by asking questions that are important to the organization – but not important to the customer. A hotel provides the setting for this segment.

Leather Seats

Cadillac spent a fortune to provide customers with the best quality leather upholstery. In spite of this, a survey revealed that its customers’ perception of quality leather was very different than Cadillac’s.

Luxury Yachts

We visit a boat yard in New York where a multi-million dollar sailing yacht is being built for a well-healed customer. This shipyard has earned a reputation for high quality boat building. Much of their success is because of their insistence in working hand-in-hand with their clients. The result is a boat that is launched in less time, has higher quality and reliability, and cost less than similar boats made by competing boat builders.

Mash Units

A team of US Army soldiers break with long-standing traditions and use quality methodology to dramatically improve the time it takes to set up a new MASH camp.

Opera Workshop

Can industrial methods be used to improve the quality of the performing arts? They were at Xavier University. Xavier used quality planning methodology to understand with precision what qualities would ensure employment for their graduating opera students. Working with the business school, a student team designed questionnaires, interviewed potential employers, created measures, and redesigned the curriculum to improve their chances for employment in the performing arts.

Oregon State Division of Motor Vehicles

Former Vice President Al Gore makes a guest appearance to explain how a motor vehicle department initially misjudged what was most important to its customers. By better understanding customer needs, the department saved big money, improved service quality, and made licensed drivers (including the VP) happier than ever before.

Ping Putters

The best way to discover what’s important to customers is to become a customer yourself. An engineer at GE does exactly that to design a golf club that has become one of the most commercially successful products in the game.

Ryobi Small Engines

Ryobi Outdoor Products used a structured quality planning process and partners with suppliers to develop a revolutionary new garden trimmer that cut down the competition.

The Allegator Hatchery

In this segment, we get up to our hips in alligators to dramatize the difference between quality improvement (getting rid of alligators one by one) and quality planning (shutting down the hatchery once and for all).

The Boeing 777

Thousands of airline executives and frequent flyers from 14 countries joined forces with Boeing designers in the development of its new jet plane. This segment highlights the enlightening results of this non-traditional quality planning project.

The Good Ship Vasa

In 1628, the huge Swedish war ship Vasa sunk moments after its maiden launch – the result of some disastrously poor quality planning. In this segment, we look at the fatal mistakes which led to this sad chapter in history. A good quality planning process would have detected any one of these flaws long before the ship was ready for launch.

The Museum of Failed Products

An unusual museum in Ithaca, New York, provides a showcase for studying quality failures of the past to avoid making the same mistakes in the future. The segment includes humorous examples of several awful products.

The New Mustang

Customers and all 400 members of the design team were teamed up to re-plan the classic Mustang. The car was introduced in 25 percent less time and for 30 percent fewer dollars than any comparable development program in Ford’s history.

The Self-Heating Can

A visit to the Museum of Design Disasters uncovers a product that failed miserably because a preoccupation with technology ignored some basic customer needs.

The Wharton School of Business

This leading business school worked with an important “customer” (business leaders who will ultimately hire graduating students) to design a curriculum that better meets the needs of these vital customers.

A Hundred Improvements

In this segment, Royal Ford Lincoln Mercury (a Canadian car dealership) finds a creative way to get all 45 employees involved in the company’s quality efforts. A program designed to institute “100 improvements in 100 days” tapped into the creativity of the workforce. Each employee was empowered to identify and implement two quality improvement ideas.

An Exercise in Synergy

The value of teamwork can be dramatized using this truly interactive Quality Minute. The segment shows twenty images in quick succession. Have individual viewers make their own list of what they saw. The average individual will recall 6-10 of the images. Then ask the viewers to make a list as a team. Most teams will remember 18-20 images.

Big Apple Crime

A well-implemented strategic quality plan (with specific goals and measures) helped New York City dramatically reduce crime rates. In a city once infamous for crime problems, New York can now boast one of the lowest crime rates for a major metropolitan area.

Fad Diets

Fad diets don’t keep the weight off, because there is no permanent effort to change eating habits and lifestyle. There’s a parallel to quality efforts, as we see in this segment.

Dont Cook Your Chicks

A chicken egg takes 21 days to incubate. No more, no less. Quality pioneer Dr. Joseph Juran uses a blow torch on some eggs to dramatize that some processes just can’t be rushed. Similarly, a company embarking on quality efforts needs to allow ample time for changes in its culture and structure to take hold.

Hannaford Brothers

In this segment, we see how self-directed work teams (empowered employees) helped this grocery distribution company become an industry leader with annual revenues of over $2 billion.

Honey Bottles

One of the America’s largest honey packers improved quality and reduced costs by partnering with one of its bottle supplier. Together they created a new design for the traditionally shaped honey bottle. The new bottle looks nearly identical but is lighter and much less susceptible to breakage.

Kelly Services

In this Quality Minute, the effective use of control charts provide the data to identify and solve a quality problem. In monitoring an 800-number hotline service, a business unit of Kelly Services noted a significant drop in response time when a specific employee was out of the office. By cross-training staff members and including guidelines that covered every conceivable contingency, Kelly was able to solve the problem once and for all.

Kodak’s Core Competencies

With a clear vision and a solid strategic quality plan to support it, any organization can not only thrive in its current market, but also expand into new markets. By separating its core competencies from its core business, a division of Kodak increased sales by expanding into entirely new markets.

Project Sobriety

In this segment, Dr. J. M. Juran tells a hilarious story to suggest that data collection and analysis are not always as simple as one might think. A good segment to point out the pitfalls of using amateurs to collect and analyze statistical data.

Ritz Carlton Line Ups

Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award winner, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, has found a way to use a long-standing tradition to communicate and reinforce its quality objectives to all employees.

Safety Shoes

In the early days of factories, the “safety shoe” was introduced to protect workers’ toes from dropping objects (a serious safety problem at the time). But despite the shoe’s proven technological benefits, the workers wouldn’t wear them. Why? The culprit was a social issue that over shadowed the technological benefits. The segment illustrates the importance of understanding and anticipating those social issues that can impede quality efforts.

Stone Hill Winery

The difference between a company’s “mission” and “vision” is made sparkling clear in this example. By clearly distinguishing between the two, Stone Hill Winery was able to increase sales by over 70 percent and create a huge and loyal customer base.

Telephone Directories

Organizations must provide a structure that encourages employee involvement. In this example, a phone company redesigned the way it had traditionally created telephone directories to give more responsibility to employees. As a result of the new process, employee turnover dropped from 28 per year to zero. Absenteeism decreased from 3 percent to .5 percent, and errors plummeted from 4 per 1,000 lines of type to 1 per 1,000 lines.

The Little Railroad That Could

Your company’s mission states what business you are in. Your company’s vision states what business you would like to be in. This segment shows how a small railroad in Maine turned its fortunes around (from near foreclosure to remarkable growth and prosperity) by clearing defining and executing a new vision for its future.

The San Diego Zoo

In this extended Quality Minute segment, we take a detailed look at how the San Diego Zoo is effectively using self-directed work teams to improve the quality of its business. Some of the resulting benefits of this new approach include a reduction in workers’ compensation claims, higher job satisfaction, lower absenteeism, and an increase in guest attendance.

The Village Blacksmith

The village blacksmith of yore is used to illustrate the value of understanding every function of the business (development, design, purchasing, production, inspection, sales, service, etc.). Like the blacksmith who personally participated in every one of these functions, empowered employees need to develop a clear understanding of the interrelationships of all business functions.

Triumph Motorcycles

Senior management at Triumph reversed its fortunes by developing a new vision and deploying a new strategic quality plan. A few years later, the company had boosted sales by over 90 percent and surpassed both Harley-Davidson and BMW in market share in the UK.

What is Quality

A Honda and a Rolls Royce are used to dramatize two different but important definitions of the word “quality” – product features and freedom from deficiencies.

Absent Admissions

The traditional process for hospital admissions is stressful to patients. When a Louisiana hospital designed their new facility, they delighted patients by virtually eliminating the frustrating admissions process.

Anthrax Outbreak

In this segment, a classic quality tool (the concentration diagram) solves a long-standing international mystery. An outbreak of deadly Anthrax in Russia was caused by infected livestock, or so said the Russian government. An American team of scientists used a concentration diagram to prove that the source of the outbreak was in reality a leak at an illegal Russian bio-chemical warfare plant.

Auto Insurance

This medical center in California consistently measures patient satisfaction to ensure self-referrals (an important lifeline for the hospital). This team used Pareto analysis to identify an important patient concern (call light response time) and to prioritize the top three causes for delays.

Call Light Response Times

This medical center in California consistently measures patient satisfaction to ensure self-referrals (an important lifeline for the hospital). This team used Pareto analysis to identify an important patient concern (call light response time) and to prioritize the top three causes for delays.

Chili Peppers

Establishing measures for quality is vital. When measures don’t exist, they have to be invented. In this segment, we learn how an objective system of measurement was created to determine the “hotness” of chili peppers.

The Cholera Epidemic

The cholera epidemic of 1854 provides a backdrop for understanding the value of quality tools (such as concentration diagrams). The segment highlights Dr. John Snow’s famous study that ended the deadly epidemic.

Dial A Mattress

By incorporating new technology into the redesign of its distribution and inventory process, DIAL-A-MATTRESS has reduced the cycle time for shipping mattresses from its warehouse. Customers ordering a mattress by phone can expect home delivery within two hours. The company turns inventory 60 times a year, a tenfold increase compared to the industry average.

Florence Nightingale

During the Crimean War, Nurse Florence Nightingale used the graphic presentation of data to convince the skeptical British Army Medical Corps to make sweeping sanitary reforms in military hospitals.

Ford vs Mazda

Ford employed 500 people in accounts payable, but Mazda had only five. In this segment, we learn how Mazda re engineered the accounting process to eliminate purchase orders and invoices.

The Freshest Flowers

Calyx & Corolla broke with tradition to re engineer an entirely new way of delivering flowers to customers. This company’s flowers arrive up to nine days fresher than those delivered by FDS.

Gunfire at Sea

In the 1890s, Sir Percy Scott discovered that during target practice, one sailor was consistently more accurate than anyone else. By identifying and replicating the sailor’s “knack,” Scott improved the accuracy of gunfire by 3000 percent.

Hula Dancing

You can’t improve what you can’t measure. When measurements don’t exist, they have to be invented. An innovative team of hula dancers came up with a way to measure their technique and improve their performance.

Kelly Services

In this Quality Minute, the effective use of control charts provide the data to identify and solve a quality problem. In monitoring an 800-number hotline service, a business unit of Kelly Services noted a significant drop in response time when a specific employee was out of the office. By cross-training staff members and including guidelines that covered every conceivable contingency, Kelly was able to solve the problem once and for all.

Military Aircraft

During World War II, why did some planes crash when hit by enemy fire, while others returned to base (even though they were full of bullet holes)? A location plot analysis revealed a surprising answer that saved lives.

New York 1 News

In this segment, we see how an innovative television news station has totally re-engineered the way news stories are compiled and presented to the viewer. The traditional budget for a New York news broadcast station is around $40 million a year. Thanks to its revolutionary approach, New York 1 News is competing successfully with an annual operating budget of only $10 million.

The Pareto Principle

The historical origins and use of this classic quality analysis tool are revealed in this segment.

Pea Tenderometer

We all know that you can’t improve what you can’t measure. What to do when measurements don’t exist, though? Don’t give up! You have to invent new measures and sensors. In this segment, the pea Tenderometer is born as a means to stop the endless debates between food processors and farmers. Up until the Tenderometer, they could never agree on how to determine the tenderness of peas objectively.

Sailing the Ocean Blue

In the mid-1800s, Matthew Maury revolutionized navigation by synthesizing the navigational logs of previous Navy voyages. The segment illustrates the value of reviewing history to improve quality in the future.

The Three Hour House

By rethinking and re engineering construction techniques and technology, a well orchestrated team actually built a San Diego home from scratch in less than three hours!

Ye Olde Brewery

Good quality measures are vital to successful quality efforts. And when measures don’t exist, they have to be created. This amusing segment goes back in time more than a century to see how European beer makers invented a way to measure a critical quality feature in their product.

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